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Certification Programs

 
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Certification Programs - March 8, 2005 11:39:00 AM   
JLS_PT_OCS

 

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There are many certification programs available in manual therapy.

They are no more required for success to successfully do manual therapy then the CSCS credential is to do strength/conditioning rehab work, but perhaps having one proves by some objective measure that you have that skill set and are comfortable using it.

Given the above, what programs/certifications does anyone have experience with, and what were any advantages/disadvantages of them?
Thanks.

_____________________________

Jason Silvernail DPT
Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist
www.silvernailstudios.com
jasonsilvernail@gmail.com
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Re: Certification Programs - March 8, 2005 1:10:00 PM   
steve

 

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Jason,

Good question. I've been trained up here in Canada and this would be the equivalent of the NAOIMT in the states. The positive parts of the curriculum is that they are very meticulous in there training technique and form that you use when applying manual therapy. Unfortunately, I have become very disillusioned with the theoretical components of the program that are equally meticulous with respect to identifying through palpation and biomechanical models without changing in response to dignificant evidence to the contrary.

Anyone attended a manual therapy program that is very evidence based?

Steve

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - March 8, 2005 2:29:00 PM   
jma

 

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I like the Institute of Physical Art (IPA) classes, given throught the US.

JMA

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Re: Certification Programs - March 8, 2005 6:29:00 PM   
Synergy

 

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There seems to be so many programs offered that I haven't a clue on which to attend. I have more knowledge of the IPA's approach than any of the others so I may inherently go with the IPA. However, I still need to research each of them to see what may interest me more.

Does anyone here know all of the programs offered in the U.S.?

_____________________________

Chris Adams, PT, MPT

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - March 9, 2005 9:19:00 AM   
JLS_PT_OCS

 

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I can think of a few off the top of my head, no particular order:

1. Institue of Physical Art
2. NAOIMT/North American academy, led by our Canadian brethren
3. Grimsby in California
4. St. Augustine/Paris in Florida
5. IAOM - International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine

Still the question remains, if you wish to pursue a further education in manual therapy, which would you pick.

Rather, a better question is probably -- "what factors enter into a decision to pursue one program over another?"

_____________________________

Jason Silvernail DPT
Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist
www.silvernailstudios.com
jasonsilvernail@gmail.com

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - March 9, 2005 11:19:00 AM   
Bournephysio

 

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One of the most evidenced based manual therapists in Canada is Bev Padfield. She is now one of the main instructors for the new manipulative therapy masters degree at the University of Western Ontario. Orthopaedic physio training at UWO has always been one of the best in the country and orthopaedic surgery in London is highly respected across the country.

I really liked the Canadian system and the NAIOMT instructors are great (I've taken courses with Pettman, Lee, and Meadows). You just have to make sure that you think for yourself and question what is taught. The Canadian system is very eclectic so if you take courses from several different instructors you get a lot of different ideas. I think that this is a very good thing.

Finally, The Queensland masters program is very well respected. I know several people who have gone that route.

If you stay in the states make sure the program is an IFOMT recognized program. All of the programs in my post are.
Doug

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Re: Certification Programs - March 9, 2005 1:51:00 PM   
steve

 

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Doug,

Your right, Bev is an excellent cross of good manual therapy and evidence based practice. I took a course from her upon graduation and found it to be very usefull.

Steve

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Re: Certification Programs - March 9, 2005 1:57:00 PM   
JLS_PT_OCS

 

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Doug,
Thanks for the great advice, and good point about IFOMT recognition for those of us who might sometime cross an international border or two.

NAIOMT has a symposium this JUN in Washington DC to address evidence based care. Might be a good one to get to...

J

_____________________________

Jason Silvernail DPT
Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist
www.silvernailstudios.com
jasonsilvernail@gmail.com

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
Post #: 8
Re: Certification Programs - March 10, 2005 12:20:00 AM   
wesselpt2

 

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Jason,
When it comes to manual therapy certification programs I look for options. This includes comprehensive topics taught in various locations around the country by various instructors (they are all good to some respect). It includes the option to take individual coarses or participate in a series (series seems more complete to me). It includes the option to continue under instructor supervision as a resident and/or potential doctoral student. I have completed the majority of IPA coarses and recommend them highly. They focus on "functional mobilization" with a strong basis in PNF. I also like the comprehensiveness of the IAOM program. They are heavily evidenced based with an emphasis on "selective tisssue testing". They all have advantages and disadvantages, ultimately, the program needs to meet your LONG-TERM objective. See you all in class.
Brian Wessel, MPT

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - March 10, 2005 12:28:00 AM   
Synergy

 

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Thanks for listing the programs Jason. :)

It's somewhat of a difficult decision to make as to which one to choose, unless one plans on seeking a variety. Personally, I would rather complete a series, as Brian says, because it's more complete and you reap the benefits of the entire program.

I am favoring the IPA simply because one of my instructors in school was a CFMT. I loved his teaching style and the apparent benefits the IPA offers (I'm sure other programs are equally beneficial).

_____________________________

Chris Adams, PT, MPT

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Re: Certification Programs - March 10, 2005 1:52:00 AM   
Alex Brenner PT MPT OCS

 

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One of the things that I don't like about the certification programs is that I think they "hold back" some techniques such as manipulation until you have paid and attended several of their "work up" courses. To me this seems like just a big money maker technique to get you to go to all of their courses when we know that manipulation can easily be taught to students/novices.

I don't know a whole lot about those programs that Jason listed but I think the best situation would be to attend an ortho residency program such as the Kaiser Hayward Physical Therapy Fellowship in Advanced Orthopedic Manual Therapy in California. I think there may be some other ortho/manual therapy residence programs but I am not familiar with them. Perhaps someone else on this forum can comment.

I will be starting soon my tDPT and Manual Physical Therapy Fellowship program taught through Regis University with Drs Tim Flynn, Julie Whitman and other well known manual PTs.
Once the Regis program is completed, one is able to sit for the FAAOMPT (Fellow in American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy) examination. I am pretty sure these credentials are a good measure of your manual therapy skills.

_____________________________

Alex Brenner, PT, MPT, OCS

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Re: Certification Programs - March 10, 2005 6:00:00 AM   
JLS_PT_OCS

 

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Alex-

I would agree that residency/fellowship is probably the best way to go, it just isn't necessarily do-able for everyone.

You should also know that you may sit for the FAAOMPT without a residency if you complete the portfolio requirement and sit for the challenge exam. The advantage of a residency program is that you get your FAAOMPT without having to sit for the exam. I don't look forward to that exam, but don't really have the time/money for a fellowship, either...

So, I am actually doing my DPT first, and then looking about for how to do the manual therapy thing later. I am hoping at that time, the number of hours for some of these manual therapy programs will be less, especially since a lot of what you spend your time on, motion palpation and biomechanical diagnosis, has such poor evidence to support it's use.

At least with the CSCS, everything I was studying was basic science directly related to training or evidence based training and conditioning stuff. Even if it wasn't directly applicable to my job, it still was valid information.
I'm not sure the manual therapy cert programs can say that, especially if they want me to know all about how to fool myself into thinking I found an FRS...as my posts from other threads will show, I already have self-delusion down as a skill, and hardly need anyone to teach me.

But I guess in order to seem worthwhile they have to spend their time teaching you SOMETHING...

_____________________________

Jason Silvernail DPT
Board-Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist
www.silvernailstudios.com
jasonsilvernail@gmail.com

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - February 13, 2006 11:26:00 PM   
j.avakian

 

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I wanted to comment on Alex's responce about the manipulation techniques being held back.

I have gone all the way through the NAIOMT system and the reason they hold back the manipulation until LIV is for safety. They don't want to teach techniques to PT's that could potentially harm our patients by being misused. The whole system is based around the safest and most effective manual techniques, and being tested at different levels to make sure you use your knowledge correctly. To deliver a manipulation is not always the hard part but it is knowing WHEN to manipulate, that can be the challange. I was treating a chiropractor once and we got into this discussion. His quote was, you can teach a monkey to manipulate but to do it safely is the challange. The underlying thought to me was that I may be able to manipulate but I may not be safe. So, the NAIOMT work hard on all there spinal and extremity manipulations to be safe and delvered correctly and to be taught as such.

I appreciate that about the group and would pay the money again to do it over!! I encourage all the PT's in my clinic to go through the system.

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Re: Certification Programs - February 14, 2006 7:50:00 AM   
docb

 

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To deliver a manipulation is not always the hard part but it is knowing WHEN to manipulate, that can be the challange. I was treating a chiropractor once and we got into this discussion. His quote was, you can teach a monkey to manipulate but to do it safely is the challange.

Forgive me for jumping in Im new to the forum and wanted to add my 2cents

I agree with this 100%.
I would look for a course that teaches good extremity joint mobes (JM)and covers the basic spinal JMs.
The general run of the mill spinal cases respond well with minimal complication from JMs.

Im not sure I would feel comfortable performing a spinal JM on a more complex case from a certification program.

Bryan

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - February 14, 2006 8:26:00 AM   
Alex Brenner PT MPT OCS

 

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I will just have to politely disagree.

J.Avakian, you seem to contradict yourself in your paragraph. You state:

[QUOTE]I have gone all the way through the NAIOMT system and the reason they hold back the manipulation until LIV is for safety.... The whole system is based around the safest and most effective manual techniques...[/QUOTE]So the system is for safety and they teach safe techniques. I agree, the techniques are safe and so safe in fact that they can easily be taught to an entry level PT student to apply them effectively in the correct situations.

I personally was taught several manipulation techniques in my PT program as a student and I was able to successfully apply these on my first 8 week clinical with no problems.

Please show me in the published literature where there is evidence to show that manipulation is unsafe for students? You won't find any but interestingly you will find some evidence that actually supports the effectiveness of students learning and applying manipulative technqiues.

I just don't buy it guys.

_____________________________

Alex Brenner, PT, MPT, OCS

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Re: Certification Programs - February 15, 2006 2:06:00 PM   
steve

 

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Alex,

I agree with you, for some reason manipulation is shrouded in secrecy for novice therapists.

If, as many of these manual therapy continuing ed courses advocate, there is safety issues for novices applying manipulation clinically, what are the specific skills and knowledge required to perform manipaulation? Often they advocate a special sense of feel although research into joint mobility testing suggests that it has poor reliability at best. Many of the testing protocals involve orthopaedic tests based on biomechanical models that have not been tested clinically or have shown low sensitivity and specificity.

Respectfully, I wonder if learning tests that have little validity leads to practicioners who have false sense of security and are less safe?

Steve

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - July 26, 2006 7:38:00 PM   
j.avakian

 

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Alex,

I am not sure how in my discussion I am contradicting myself. You appear to pull out a segment of my statement and apply it to something I didn't talk about. The topic of teaching manipulation to entry level students is a whole different can of worms. I think that is great that you were taught to manipulate and performed them sucessfully on your patients as a student but I have had smart students who could barely perform a joint mob in the spine or in the appendiges much less manipulate safely.

My answer was to justify why the NAIOMT teaches their courses in a series of levels. All manual therapy programs teach in levels so the material is intergrated well and can be used effectivly by the therapist. It is not to hold out any specific techniques from anyone.

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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Re: Certification Programs - August 13, 2006 3:59:00 AM   
rv36116

 

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Any objections to listing the initial set of 5 MDT courses as manual courses? Hands on, is amazingly enough, a good portion of the latter parts of the McKenzie series.

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Re: Certification Programs - September 11, 2006 9:56:00 PM   
ptdan23

 

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I have attended the manual therapy courses at the University of St. Augustine w/ Dr. Stanley Paris, etc. I started in August of 2003 and sat for certification in October of 2005. I passed 18 out of 21 portions and then today completed and passed the three remaining portions. I can tell you that since taking these seminars and going through the certification process that I am a much better clnician than I was before. It has given me many many skills that I am able to use everyday to get great outcomes with my patients. I plan on continuing on doing the tDPT at USA. I would like to do some sore of Fellowship or Residency however like it was mentioned above this is not feasible for everyone as is my case at the moment.

Dan, PT, MTC.

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RE: Certification Programs - July 25, 2007 10:30:10 PM   
ROOSA

 

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I just had the grueling experience of completeing my Manual Therapy Certification given by the University of St. Augustine and Stanely Paris, PhD, PT.  It is, in my mind, the most intensive and difficult program to complete.  It encompasses the entire body with the main focus being on the spine.  It is largely respected for the following reasons:
                            1.  Stanely Paris, PhD- runs the certification
                            2.  Difficulty Level- ~15 out of 25 pass on the first attempt
                            3.  Ecclectic approach- it pulls from a variety of schools of thought

I have full confidence that the porcess of MTC will forever change you as a clinician and bring you to a higher level.  Good luck...

(in reply to JLS_PT_OCS)
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